Wolverton Park

Either side of the redeveloped area of Wolverton, which thoughtfully has the canal running through, (town planners take note, canals are a benefit not an eyesore) there are two magnificent sculptures called Reaching Forward commemorating Wolverton’s industrial heritage.

This one is holding a row of progressive cyclists, the first being a penny farthing, the last a modern racing bike. And the sculptures body is made of polished steel.

And this one is holding a train and the figures structure represents railway track.

The buildings behind this one are the old railway buildings used when steam trains needed to be refueled with coal and water, so the victorian gentry would alight and retire to the reading rooms to partake of refreshments and attend to their toilette! Apparently when the railway was originally built Northampton declined to have a station in as it attracted the “London riff raff” So the tiny rural village of Wolverton was chosen and consequently became a thriving centre. The Reading Room is now an office overlooking the canal.

This mural must be about 100m and depicts many of the industries that took advantage of the railway.

industry has long since gone and Wolverton itself has been swallowed up by the new town of Milton Keynes. In our opinion it remains a fascinating place worth exploring, with a diverse culture of old and modern, run down and trendy.

 

Let’s remember Friday

Whilst it was still spring, and the sun was warming our souls. We saw our first butterfly of the year, a bumble bee and a tree in full blossom. We were moored in Wolverton Park by the rather smart flats and rings to make tying up so easy.

John and Martina from NB Burnt Oak stopped for coffee as they went past. I foolishly forgot to take a photo of the two Braidbar buddies moored next to each other, but I’ll sort that out next week as we have plans to do some cruising together. They want to ‘hear’ Firecrest on the move, Ha, they’ll be disappointed cause we really do cruise silently with our electric motor.

I took advantage of being so close to civilisation and used the laundrette to give the bedding an extra good wash. And to refill the cupboards with staples from Tesco.

I also came across the Milton Keynes community Fridge. I’ve heard about these but not seen them in practice before. Surplus food is donated and made available to anyone in the community. I did my usual and struck up a conversation with a lovely lady called Lois. The first thing she said to me was “don’t tell me you don’t need handouts, the community Fridge is all about keeping usable food out of landfill, please help us by taking whatever you can use.” So I accepted and helped myself to a slightly stale but  very edible baguette, 2 pears, 2 oranges, 2 tomatoes, a cabbage, courgette, and a bag of new potatoes, plus a packet of hot cross buns. There was plenty left for the next person. If you’re passing through Wolverton go along and help them out. It’s open over Thursday and Friday lunchtime and every evening from 7 until 9pm. I’m used to giving generously so it was quite a humbling experience to be given something for nothing. And I must admit it did make me think about how it must feel if you need to be on the receiving end of charitable acts.

We moved the boat in the afternoon cause we needed to run our not so silent generator and didn’t want to disturb our neighbours in the flats. Only 5 minutes away but it was out in the open. I got some more washing done, went for a walk and cooked a mash up tea that felt like I was taking part in the Masterchef store cupboard challenge. We both agreed it was a good day.


6Today we woke up to sleet and snow and howling gales. The temperature as forecast had plummeted and nothing could persuade either of us to even open the hatches let alone leave the boat. Saturday was designated a Duvet day. Lets hope Sunday is a bit more promising.

 

Making the most of spring

While I was walking around mums Lakeland village we found this pond absolutely full of frog spawn. Really took us by surprise because there was still quite a bit of snow in drifts and I thought it was still way too cold for the frogs to spring into action. Hope some of it survives.

We’ve enjoyed a few days reaching double figures in Milton Keynes. But we’re braced for the Beast II due to arrive overnight. As they say ‘Ne’er cast a clout till May be outAnd I’ve not packed my thermals away yet.

 

Before and After – Job Done

Can you see the big smile on my face ?

I have finished the plumbing, cruised to the water point and spent 3 hours filling up. Cosgrove is a very slow tap that does not have enough pressure to expand our expandable hose to even half the boat length. Still at this time of year there are not many boat’s wanting water so it wasn’t a problem.

Full tank of cold water, full tanks of hot water, washing done – no leaks – I am a happy man.

Yes I will admit, I also did some clothes washing – purely in the interest of testing the washing machine plumbing you understand. I have to maintain my male chauvinist image, it could not possibly be so that Cheryl didn’t come back to a full basket of dirty laundry. But I don’t want to set a precedent here ! ! !

Not only am I pleased that the plumbing is done and our boat is back to normal, but now that I have hot water – I shaved for the first time in a few days.

Before

 

After

 

Has it been worthwhile – YES, YES , YES

  • No more hot water from our cold water tap and drinking water tap.
  • No more cold water pipes being hot when they should be cold.
  • No more struggling to get to the drain points.
  • No more water left in the pipes once they’ve been drained.
  • No more wasted diesel heating cold water unnecessarily in the middle of the night.
  • No more sagging unsupported pipework.

Ok it’s a bit soon to know for sure if I’ve fixed all the problems but so far so good and no leaks seen.

All I have done is follow the manufacturers installation manuals and used good plumbing practice. I find it staggering that people, both builder’s and customers are prepared to accept “it’s the way we’ve always done it” when clearly if Firecrest is anything to go by, it could be so much better, easier safer, more economical and durable.

I enjoyed my cruise to and from the water point, in the sunshine, watching the ducks, swans and canada geese – that’s what boating is all about. Not struggling to make sense of plumbing. But best of all, Cheryl will be back home tomorrow and I can’t wait.

Fast running water

While Eric’s been working hard on Firecrest, I’ve enjoying Lakeland’s fast running water.

I’m sure we’ve got this the wrong way around but mum loves to pamper me.No trip home is without the obligatory visit to Sizergh Barn where the cafe has been built over the milking parlour and the raw milk tastes even better than it did when we were children.

And despite the dreary grey weather we did find some colour, albeit in the garden centre.

No Water

That’s no water on the boat not in the canals.  Not because we have run out of water, but because I am fixing the plumbing.

We have been planning to moor in Wolverton (north Milton Keynes) for some months now so I could be close to DIY shops.  Well by close I mean a 3 mile round trip to Screwfix, 5 miles round trip to B&Q.  Still parts bought by click and collect, Cheryl’s gone home to leave me to it, and now I have started.  Its mothering Sunday so a good time for Cheryl to spend a few days with her mum, and allow me to spread bits all over the boat.

So why am I fixing the plumbing on a new boat?

We have often noticed the water coming out of our cold water tap is warm, sometimes hot enough to wash your hands under the tap.  What is worse the warm water also comes out of our drinking water tap.  I did ask my boat builder about this but was told my boat was plumbed how they always do it – so that’s it – not their fault.

After researching the issues, reading manufactures fitting instructions, thinking about it and examining the plumbing, the issue is there is no non-return valve between the hot water and cold water systems, as is recommended by the manufactures of many of the parts fitted, and other experienced boating people.  To make that problem worse, the pressurised expansion tank is on the hot side of the clarifier (hot water cylinder) so that pushes hot water into the cold water pipes.

While investigating I also found a cold water pipe that was as hot as a central heating pipe 24hrs a day.  It turns out that hot water from the top of the clarifier is self circulating though this pipe resulting in the heat lost cooling the tank.  This explains why I have noticed the boiler turning on in the middle of the night to heat hot water which it should almost never do.  This is easy to avoid with proper plumbing but now requires me to change even more of the system.

The third problem that needs fixing I did not discover until I tried to drain the system.  After 2 hrs of trying to get a tool to the drain point which was sandwiched between the 22mm heating pipes and the clarifier, I ended up having to undo another joint to drain the system.  This is particularly bizarre because if you leave a boat unoccupied in the winter it needs to be winterised, which involves completely draining all the water pipes and water tanks to ensure there is not damage from freezing, and subsequent flooding.

Hopefully I will have cold water back by tonight.  I have fitted an isolation valve between the cold water and hot water systems which will allow me to completely re-plumb the hot water side over the next few days, while still having cold water to use.

On the move

Time to say goodbye to my snowman  and move on. The canal still has one or two floating icebergs which wanted to come with us. It seemed to stick to the bow for quite a way.

The melting snow and ice has raised the level of the canal but we’re unlikely to suffer with flooding because of the regular overflows. This one wouldn’t have looked out of place as a theme park ride although I’m glad Eric wouldn’t let me try it out, I’m not sure anything going down that raging torrent would survive.

It was lovely to be cruising again, even nicer not being wrapped up in our thermals and a joy to see the sun shining on the boat in the early evening.

Continue reading On the move

Cutting paths through the ice

We woke to blue sky and sunshine but the ducks were still ice skating. It was strange because the ice had a layer of water floating on it. But they weren’t walking on water for long when the first of the boats came along creating an open channel. 

 

We were passed by 4 boats making a run for it, including one hire boat-bet they weren’t expecting a week like this.

The only snow left on the tow path was pretending to be a snowman so I donned the boots and went for a walk. I found 6 gloves 2 hats and pair of earmuffs.

Now that the ice is breaking up, the boat’s rocking about all over the place cause our ropes have blackened off. So We’ve re-tied and will stay here another night.

The mighty thaw has begun

And left slush and mud and misery. My poor snowman has lost their smile and so have I. 

The grass is muddy and slippy but the actual footpath is like a mini canal. Having been compressed and indented by thousands of footsteps there’s nowhere for the melted snow to drain away to. So of course people are walking on the grass making the mud worse.

I don’t care how much warmer it is,  I don’t intend walking anywhere until all this horrible stuff has all gone.  Can you tell how much I dislike mud.

And as for cruising, the ducks are still waddling through the slush over the ice, so although there’s growing ice free water, we’ll let someone else go first. We’ve still got enough in our tanks to last another week without worry.

We’re being watched

I will never apologise for letting my inner child come out to play, and after Thursday’s dire biting cold wind and blizzards. Then Fridays trudging march to the shops, to stock up on essentials, I woke up this morning determined to go out to play.

There’s at least 6 inches of snow now, which I know isn’t competing with some other parts of Britain, but as the forecast is getting warmer by the hour and rain predicted tonight, I knew it was now or never to build a friend.

It’s been quite amusing watching the walkers reaction.  I deliberately didn’t build my friend on the footpath, but on the wide grassy verge between the boat and path.  However because the path is obscured by the snow most people are taking the direct route and having to walk around Mrs Snowman. Many have stopped to say hello and take her photo.