Here be Dragons

We had a lovely few days on Victoria Embankment overlooking, (or should that be underlooking) Trent Bridge, watching the Dragon Boat training. Eric doesn’t like the thought of me sitting at the bow beating a drum, it defeats the idea of a silent electric boat, and besides as all boaters know…. you shouldn’t go fast past moored boats…..But it was time to set off back up the Beeston Canal through Nottingham, admiring the grand warehouse developementsand snapping almost identical photos to those that took on our outward journey. I wonder if the sun always shines on this canalside hub. We never found out how to access it from city side.

 

Overnight in Nottingham

The 5 mile Beeston Canal bypasses an un-navigable section of the river Trent and takes us through central Nottingham. I thought this would be a treat, but the anticipation of a big shopping centre failed to excite me once I got out to explore. I morn the demise of a proper high street with independent shops selling goods they are proud of. But it’s not all bad, there has been some effort to take advantage of the canal and make it into an attractive community space.Fellows Morton and Clayton had a big warehouse and wharf here which is now a thriving bar selling craft beer.One good thing about town centre canals is that there’s often a supermarket close enough for me to surreptitiously take a full trolley right back to the boat.  And there was a super view of the castle from the retail park. Mooring was unrestricted by Sainsbury’s but we moved on around the corner to take advantage of an over hanging tree. Although there were a lot of people using the tow path and some rough sleepers, it was a quiet night. We set off the next day to complete the last two miles of this section.Quite a mix of old and new buildings to catch our attention. Nottingham is a tall city. This one particularly caught our eye.And some lovely bridges.although not every one agrees with CRT’s recent rebranding, spending goodness knows how much on promoting the canal network to a wider audience. Not sure how wide an audience this sign will reach being underneath the bridge.

Beeston’s Bs

That’ll be starting with

George the Beekeeper of Beeston who took his place in the shopping centre along with his hive 30 years ago. I think he looks rather content. 

Unlike the canal company men who in 1844 who fell victim to cost saving measures. They had their free Beer privilages withdrawn “…unless absolutely necessary and then never more than a quart per day”

But canal workers must have been clean souls, apparently Beeston lock contains the equivalent of 1500 Bathtubs full of water.

And then there’s the Beautiful Beeston. On Saturday there was a multi cultural community Bonanza. It was a fabulous event, designed to bring together the richly diverse cultures of the area. Nottingham University attracts a lot of Chinese students, who have gone on to make their home here. bringing their dancing dragons with them.the Dragon display was performed by the martial arts club
We were all encouraged to have a good at some Bollywood moves. All too energetic for me. But there were some lovely choirs and other dance groups to watch and enjoy.Sadly this week, Beeston was at the heart of commemorations for the Chilwell Bomb Explosion, where 139 people lost their live at a shell filling factory a few miles down the road from here.

You might have guessed I’d want to know if which came first, Beeston or the Bees. Beeston got its name from it’s Saxon heritage Bes was the type of grain grown, nowadays known as Rye and Tun being a settlement. Bes-Tun became Beeston. And as its got Bees it’s also got Birds. The Attenborough nature reserve lakes next to the river attract an even more diverse selection of birds than the town has cultures. The Sandmartins are fully occupied feeding their young which was quite spectacular to watch so close. Although nothing will beat me seeing a wild Osprey flying over. Osprey use the river Trent as a navigational aid on their journey north. And they are seen quite often at Attenborough. Of course you’ll have to take my word for it cause I was too slow to get camera out.

 

Baking in Beeston

The River Trent skirts the southeast of Nottingham but it can be rocky, shallow and not navigable for narrowboats, its also prone to flooding hence the need for huge weir.
And a canal to maintain transport links.The Beeston Canal was completed in the late 18th century. It runs from the river into the  centre of Nottingham where it connected with the Nottingham  canal bringing coal down from Langley Mill, however that section was closed and filled in leaving us the 5 miles into and out of the city to explore.But first, with a good mooring (we’re on the left just before the trees start) and temperatures set to bake we decided to explore Beeston itself.And what better place to start than the Beeston Marina Boathouse Cafe, where Tony serves a huge breakfast.Followed by doing ALL the washing at this brilliant launderette, -worth checking out these Revolution outdoor launderettes, they’re springing up all over the place. Which of course meant I could justify the best ice cream of the season at the canal heritage centre next to the lock. Before going back to some sun soaking