Beeston’s Bs

That’ll be starting with

George the Beekeeper of Beeston who took his place in the shopping centre along with his hive 30 years ago. I think he looks rather content. 

Unlike the canal company men who in 1844 who fell victim to cost saving measures. They had their free Beer privilages withdrawn “…unless absolutely necessary and then never more than a quart per day”

But canal workers must have been clean souls, apparently Beeston lock contains the equivalent of 1500 Bathtubs full of water.

And then there’s the Beautiful Beeston. On Saturday there was a multi cultural community Bonanza. It was a fabulous event, designed to bring together the richly diverse cultures of the area. Nottingham University attracts a lot of Chinese students, who have gone on to make their home here. bringing their dancing dragons with them.the Dragon display was performed by the martial arts club
We were all encouraged to have a good at some Bollywood moves. All too energetic for me. But there were some lovely choirs and other dance groups to watch and enjoy.Sadly this week, Beeston was at the heart of commemorations for the Chilwell Bomb Explosion, where 139 people lost their live at a shell filling factory a few miles down the road from here.

You might have guessed I’d want to know if which came first, Beeston or the Bees. Beeston got its name from it’s Saxon heritage Bes was the type of grain grown, nowadays known as Rye and Tun being a settlement. Bes-Tun became Beeston. And as its got Bees it’s also got Birds. The Attenborough nature reserve lakes next to the river attract an even more diverse selection of birds than the town has cultures. The Sandmartins are fully occupied feeding their young which was quite spectacular to watch so close. Although nothing will beat me seeing a wild Osprey flying over. Osprey use the river Trent as a navigational aid on their journey north. And they are seen quite often at Attenborough. Of course you’ll have to take my word for it cause I was too slow to get camera out.

 

Baking in Beeston

The River Trent skirts the southeast of Nottingham but it can be rocky, shallow and not navigable for narrowboats, its also prone to flooding hence the need for huge weir.
And a canal to maintain transport links.The Beeston Canal was completed in the late 18th century. It runs from the river into the  centre of Nottingham where it connected with the Nottingham  canal bringing coal down from Langley Mill, however that section was closed and filled in leaving us the 5 miles into and out of the city to explore.But first, with a good mooring (we’re on the left just before the trees start) and temperatures set to bake we decided to explore Beeston itself.And what better place to start than the Beeston Marina Boathouse Cafe, where Tony serves a huge breakfast.Followed by doing ALL the washing at this brilliant launderette, -worth checking out these Revolution outdoor launderettes, they’re springing up all over the place. Which of course meant I could justify the best ice cream of the season at the canal heritage centre next to the lock. Before going back to some sun soaking

 

Remembering Dad

We’ve now arrived in Nottingham which has been our destination goal for a while now. The reason being is that during the annual Methodist conference there is a service of thanksgiving for its ministers who have died over the past 12 months, and this year’s venue is Nottingham university.Eric’s dad was ordained as a Methodist minister in 1953 He cared for several churches around the country, starting out in the North East moving gradually south until he retired in South West in 1990 He and Mum then moved to Hampshire, nearer family, where he carried on preaching for another 20 or so years. Almost 70 years caring for people, and he truly was a most caring and compassionate man, always willing to support and guide anyone in need. We said our farewells to him at his funeral last November, but this week the church he’d served so faithfully paid their respects and gave thanks for all their departed ministers. It was a moving and appropriate tribute. We are glad we came.

It wasn’t to be a day of sadness though. We were joined by one of Eric’s brothers, David and his wife Amanda. Which meant that we enjoyed a day of reminiscing as well taking them on a short cruise on the Beeston Canal. David has researched the family tree and discovered that Willie Jones, Eric’s great grandfather had been a canal wharf porter in Warrington. No wonder we felt drawn to life on the cut.