Forget me not


Usually we love this time of year, with ducklings and spring flowers, but this May it’s been a struggle just to accept what is, is. The weather has really put a dampener on our spirits. We’ve had some lovely meetings up with friends and family, but all with shadows of having to be careful, not to get too close, and will it be warm and dry enough to meet outside. Equally so, this has impacted on our cruising, and desire to explore. But we still realise just how lucky we are to live this life and really how little serious impact Covid really has had on us personally. We cruised up to Shobnall Marina in Burton to fill up with diesel.

It really is a great little marina and Chandlery, if not least because diesel prices are so good, 69p/l, mind you it’s a skill getting in and out of this place as it is situated on the now disused Bond End arm cut. So it’s a sharp right under the bridge, and a reverse out.

The weather dictated our next stop, fearing imminent rain, we stopped to overnight at Branston Water park. But after a heavy downpour the sun came back out again. Giving us magnificent clouds to enjoy.

I was a bit worried Branston had become more of a safari park, than a nature reserve, when we saw this lioness sitting on the towpath.


But it didn’t deter the family of geese guarding Firecrest


And we snatched half an hour’s sunshine to walk through the woods around the lakes.

We continued our journey the next day past the lovely Tatenhill lock, where its cottage is now a desirable Bed and Breakfast.

The next stretch of canal runs a close parallel to the A38 so for an hour or so, we just have to grin and bear the noise of heavy traffic. Grumpy me would like to say “we were here first” but actually the A38 follows the roman road here, so in this instance we accept the road was here before the canal. We returned to tranquility as the river Trent and the canal mingle again for a short while. And today there were warning signs to “enter with care” as levels are in the amber zone, but looking at the flow and comments from oncoming boats, we weren’t too concerned and passed through safely.

We stopped on the 48 hour Alrewas moorings to sit out another day or two of threatened rain.


And again enjoy the dramatic clouds in between the deluge.

Avoiding the weather


It seems like we are planning our cruising around the weather forecast these days. This time last year we were bemoaning the fact that we were locked in the Salthouse Dock in Liverpool when the sun was cracking the flags and it was perfect cruising weather.

12 months ago in sunny Salthouse Dock not allowed to cruise

But this year, April showers have turned into May monsoons. Ok perhaps not that bad, and the bright moments have been snatched and glorious.

Sunset at Swarkestone

We cruised up to Burton, travelling alongside Deep Dale Lane, which always makes us chuckle. We’re wondering if the signage is warning cars not to fall off the road into the canal, or warning boaters of the to be on guard for cars landing on their boats.

Deep Dale Lane

I’ve never seen any signage warning the sheep to take extra care,

Ewe better be careful

And sadly yes, I have seen more animals floating belly up, than cars going for a swim. Perhaps this heron is on sentry duty keeping an eye. Herons are used to canal life but usually fly off at the last moment so it was quite a treat to get up close and personal to this one standing on the side at Dallows lock.

Quite magnificent birds

It’s always a relief to see Dallow’s lock as we cruise into Burton. It’s the first of the single locks, which are so much easier to work through. But we moored up shortly after this in Burton.

14 day mooring in Burton

This stretch of Towpath is maintained by the homeowners who take great pride in their section, even the Armco edge had been neatly trimmed. But oh boy when it rained, the footpath took on the appearance of a new canal in its own right. We called it the Baby Burton Branch

The Baby Burton Branch

If it hadn’t been so miserable I’d have made some paper boats to float down in. Instead we sat inside and waited until it was dry enough to continue another few miles west.

Winter blues

I’m feeling very British, needing to talk about the weather. It’s dire, bleak and wintery, with sleet and biting winds. The temptation is to snuggle down under the duvet and go into hibernation. I’m certainly not cruising anywhere whilst it’s like this.

Thankgoodness I had the foresight to fill the larder with enough food to see us through at least a week without any repetition or two or three weeks of pasta and tomato sauce.

We don’t even get any TV reception here so I’m making the most of this enforced idleness by catching up on some knitting projects.

A scarf that has been on the needles for too long and needs to get finished. And to add a splash of colour, last week I finished a cardigan for my new nephew, Solomon