Moving on to Oxford

We waved goodbye to the lovely Buttercup meadows of Eynsham

Buttercups

Past Dukes Cut junction where we joined the Thames a few weeks ago, and into Kings lock. Which although it didn’t have any fancy topiary that we’d seen upstream but was appropriately guarded for a king. Kings lock was the last pound lock built by the Thames Conservancy in 1928 when George V was on the throne so I assume it was named for him.

The King’s Lock Dragon

The next lock, at Godstow was the first stone built lock built in 1790. Godstow had been home to an Abbey and nunnery but Henry VIII put paid to that during the resolution of the monasteries, I wonder if that’s where some of the lock stones came from.

Godstow abbey ruins

Now Godstow is the first of the electro-hydraulic locks we shall meet on our journey downstream. We shared it with a lovely young couple who showed us which buttons to press.

I still cant convince Eric to let me have a roof garden

We cruised through Port Meadow and caught our first glimpses of Oxford’s dreaming spires, although the skyline was over dominated by cranes taller that the beautiful buildings we strained to see.

Dreaming spires in the distance

Under the Red Bridge or Medley foot bridge to give it s proper name,

Medley bridge


And onto a mooring snuggled into the trees

Where the next day we had a spur of the moment meeting when Amanda stopped off for lunch as she just happened to be driving past.

Always nice to have visitors

Port Meadow is a pleasant 20 minute walk into the centre of Oxford, so as we couldnt see any mooring restrictions, we settled down to enjoy a bit of a holiday.

Overwhelmed by York

York doesn’t need much promotion, it knows how to welcome it’s visitors, first there where the Romans and then the Anglo Saxons, the Vikings, the Norman’s where various kings benefitted, or not from the cities prosperity, the Georgians weren’t all that interested in York, and then the Victorians arrived with the railway. All have helped create a beautiful vibrant multifaceted and very interesting place, that can’t be summed up in my litte blog. Nowadays school trips coach trips, Japanese and the racing fraternity all grace the streets. But despite there hardly being an inch of space to spare we cruised past the trip boats under Lendel Bridge

Lendel Bridge

and were able to moor up along side the museum gardens to enjoy the sites and sounds of this amazing place.

Museum gardens visitor mooring

I couldn’t wait to leap off Firecrest and run up the steps to be greeted by our first view of the Minster such a magnificent building that dominates York.

York Minster

We couldn’t go exploring straight away as We had to welcome our own visitors, Anne and Richard were still in yorkshire and came see us and arrived an hour after we moored up.

Friends forever

With only few hours together, we decided to start by walking the walk but it was just too hot to do the whole circumference. But we got lovely views of the Minster and some of the rather fancy restaurants

Champagne view from the wall

We wanted to end our afternoon together with an ice cream but the fancy bar on the river front had tempting cool beer.

Low cal icecream

And then we settled down for the evening to contemplate all the lovely things we were going to see in York, if we could afford them.

Lendel Bridge In the evening.