Jammin’ with the Stone Strawberries

Our deadline destination was to reach Stone. Because way back in early April we booked to have our 4 year Boat Safety Scheme examination done there. Give or take a few miles, that’s about 80 miles and 50 locks. According to ACC canal planner it could take us less than a week if we put our minds to it. Up the Grand Union Leicester line and the River Soar, then turn left for a few miles upstream on the River Trent, and finally onto the Trent and Mersey Canal. 7 weeks later we have finally made it. We had been looking forward to mooring up at Great Haywood to visit the Shugborough Hall, but alas Covid booking requirements and dreary weather meant that I only caught a glimpse from the canal, and the rather lovely Essex pack horse Bridge over the Trent as I hopped off to work us through the lock.

Shugborough Estate

We enjoy the Trent and Mersey, being so long, there’s a real diversity of things to look at, so one day we will be back to exercise our National Trust cards, and actually go inside the Hall. That is, of course, if we don’t get seen off first, as this rather aggressive swan foolishly tried to do.

Trespassers will be pecked

We’ve ruffled a few feathers in the past, but never been attacked whilst in the boat, but this rather over protective father certainly made it known we weren’t welcome anywhere near his offspring. Perhaps he was offended because I didn’t take a photo of them. Unlike these cuties that were being shown off in Stone.

Obligatory cute swan with cygnets photo

We needed to moor close to a convenient parking space for our BSS and as luck would have it there was space on the 5 day mooring next to M&S, ideal for Mike our examiner. He came, examined and passed us without any problem. We get the impression that this boat MOT requirement is more concerned to ensure that your boat shouldn’t be a hazard to any neighbours, rather than checking it’s integrity for your own safety. Mind you, it wouldn’t be practical to insist every boat is hauled out of the water to look for thin patches on the hull structure. And narrowboats don’t have break pads to check, though perhaps an oral exam that anyone helming a boat understands the need to slow down well before they pass a moored boat might might not be a bad thing. Being so close to M&S did have other advantages besides its car park. They had over stocked on strawberries so at 50p for 500g I couldn’t resist.

What a bargain

And I made the Stone Strawberry jam.

4 jars of stone strawberry jam

This will be labelled up and eaten during Wimbledon fortnight with scones and clotted cream.

Still going West, slowly going North


The canal and the river Trent follow a fairly close trajectory, which makes sense both geographically and economically. Great rivers have always provided opportunities for settlement and industry, however it was the building of the canals that allowed for economic expansion with a horsedrawn barge being able to carry up to 50 times more cargo than a cart, and with probably fewer breakages and a speedier transit. This is one of the things that we love about continual cruising on the canals. The canal’s transport links create a sense of purpose, yet one minute we can be moored in the most idyllic rural haven without a care in the world sitting on the towpath with my spinning wheel.

Moored by Tuppenhurst lane, Handisacre


but the next day we will be passing through our countries industrial necessities. Why does travelling past the Armitage toilet factory always make me chuckle, perhaps it’s a sign of me being a boater or perhaps it’s my inner child escaping.

What a convenience having the canal so close

And of course, where there is industry, there are also people, who are endlessly fascinating to watch, especially those who choose to adorn their space with a wackiness that just begs to be captured, and as Naomi’s Landing fb page is advertised on a big banner, I’m sure she doesn’t mind being a boaters talking point.

Naomi’s Landing at Rugeley


Especially as Dr Feelgood and Nurse Rached are so keen on vacinating everyone. I only hope when my turn comes the syringe isnt quite that big.

Even the NHS need to take some time gongoozleing

We think the Dancing Sheep manequins have the edge over the Top Gear team at Charity dock on the Ashby. But you still can’t beat a real sheep. These beauties were at Tuppenhurst lane farm.

The content sheep at Tuppenhurst farm

We took a several days to get from Fradley through to Stone, taking some time in Rugeley to meet friends in a pub for lunch and take advantage of the very convenient Tesco. Life is starting to feel strangely normal. Or is it? Is this boat moored or parked?

Irrelevance? Good name for a stranded boat

We’ve even seen some sunshine.

Yes, we’re still getting sun on the solar panels

A few days in Fradley

We were still playing dodge the rain as we our journey continued. It’s quicker to walk from Alrewas to Fradley, as its only 2 miles but the 7 locks have the potential to make it into a 2.5 hour cruise. But we struck lucky with most of the locks in our favour and the volunteer lockies were on good form helping the many boats through the flight, while chatting to the gongoozlers.

Just before turning left onto the coventry

We decided to stop on the 14 day visitor mooring above the top lock, and just as Eric was tying off we were approached by someone with a big grin on his face and the opening statement “I built your boat”. It turns out Sam is one of Tim Tyler’s team of steel fabricators who built our hull. It was a real treat and honour to meet him and thank him, telling him just how much we love Firecrest. We weren’t able to invite him on board to look around, but he was able to peer through the portholes. I think he enjoyed being able to see a completed boat.

A chance meeting

Just after he’d said goodbye, we were joined by another Braidbar boat

Gettinf to know the Potters too

So after a lovely few days chatting we continued our journey, with the most southerly point of the Trent and Mersey being 10 minutes out of Fradley . Believe it or not the sun was shining as we set off, not that you’d believe me.

The glorious south!!!!


I had walked ahead to set Woodend lock and got soaked. I could have done with one of those decorative teapots being full of tea.

At least the rain had stopped

It’s usually a pretty place but the rain was dampening our spirits, and we had just seen the beautiful countryside decimated in preparation for HS2. Mind you we are very philosophical about HS2, we’ve always accepted that the building of this mammoth infrastructure will be far worse than we think the actual negative impact of HS2 will be in years to come.

HS2 here you

But after all, what did people say about the canals ripping through the countryside 300 years ago.

48 hours in Alrewas


We moored up expecting rain but were rewarded with a few precious moments worth of blue sky as I looked across the water meadows.

The view from the visitor moorings by the lock

We had seen the church perched on the hill as we cruised through Wychnor

St Leaonards, Wychnor

So I took the opportunity to walk back along the river section for a closer look.

River reeds

I climbed up the hill and found some info boards in the adjoining fields hinting of the archaeological significance of mediaeval settlements, but the village was wiped out during the plague, I didn’t stick around to investigate more. Alrewas however survived and became a thriving village with some stunning timber framed thatched cottages

Shakespeares cottage

And Coates, one of our favourite butchers shops.

Coates Butchers, worth a visit

We can recommend the pies, sausages and rump steak, however we suspected the local camel would taste a bit wooden.

We think the wise men must be on their summer holidays

We wondered if there’s an equivalent term for boaters who look wistfully at houses like gongoozlers watch narrowboats. And where does that place us with our modern electric boat, hankering after an old thatched cottage.

We didn’t make it up to the national memorial arboretum this visit, preferring to follow ratty’s advice on this Canal side cottage.

Simply messing about in boats

So we had to smile when we came across another Braidbar boat, appropriately named.

Boating about in Simply Messing

And we continued our journey up to Fradley

Bagnall lock

Forget me not


Usually we love this time of year, with ducklings and spring flowers, but this May it’s been a struggle just to accept what is, is. The weather has really put a dampener on our spirits. We’ve had some lovely meetings up with friends and family, but all with shadows of having to be careful, not to get too close, and will it be warm and dry enough to meet outside. Equally so, this has impacted on our cruising, and desire to explore. But we still realise just how lucky we are to live this life and really how little serious impact Covid really has had on us personally. We cruised up to Shobnall Marina in Burton to fill up with diesel.

It really is a great little marina and Chandlery, if not least because diesel prices are so good, 69p/l, mind you it’s a skill getting in and out of this place as it is situated on the now disused Bond End arm cut. So it’s a sharp right under the bridge, and a reverse out.

The weather dictated our next stop, fearing imminent rain, we stopped to overnight at Branston Water park. But after a heavy downpour the sun came back out again. Giving us magnificent clouds to enjoy.

I was a bit worried Branston had become more of a safari park, than a nature reserve, when we saw this lioness sitting on the towpath.


But it didn’t deter the family of geese guarding Firecrest


And we snatched half an hour’s sunshine to walk through the woods around the lakes.

We continued our journey the next day past the lovely Tatenhill lock, where its cottage is now a desirable Bed and Breakfast.

The next stretch of canal runs a close parallel to the A38 so for an hour or so, we just have to grin and bear the noise of heavy traffic. Grumpy me would like to say “we were here first” but actually the A38 follows the roman road here, so in this instance we accept the road was here before the canal. We returned to tranquility as the river Trent and the canal mingle again for a short while. And today there were warning signs to “enter with care” as levels are in the amber zone, but looking at the flow and comments from oncoming boats, we weren’t too concerned and passed through safely.

We stopped on the 48 hour Alrewas moorings to sit out another day or two of threatened rain.


And again enjoy the dramatic clouds in between the deluge.

Avoiding the weather


It seems like we are planning our cruising around the weather forecast these days. This time last year we were bemoaning the fact that we were locked in the Salthouse Dock in Liverpool when the sun was cracking the flags and it was perfect cruising weather.

12 months ago in sunny Salthouse Dock not allowed to cruise

But this year, April showers have turned into May monsoons. Ok perhaps not that bad, and the bright moments have been snatched and glorious.

Sunset at Swarkestone

We cruised up to Burton, travelling alongside Deep Dale Lane, which always makes us chuckle. We’re wondering if the signage is warning cars not to fall off the road into the canal, or warning boaters of the to be on guard for cars landing on their boats.

Deep Dale Lane

I’ve never seen any signage warning the sheep to take extra care,

Ewe better be careful

And sadly yes, I have seen more animals floating belly up, than cars going for a swim. Perhaps this heron is on sentry duty keeping an eye. Herons are used to canal life but usually fly off at the last moment so it was quite a treat to get up close and personal to this one standing on the side at Dallows lock.

Quite magnificent birds

It’s always a relief to see Dallow’s lock as we cruise into Burton. It’s the first of the single locks, which are so much easier to work through. But we moored up shortly after this in Burton.

14 day mooring in Burton

This stretch of Towpath is maintained by the homeowners who take great pride in their section, even the Armco edge had been neatly trimmed. But oh boy when it rained, the footpath took on the appearance of a new canal in its own right. We called it the Baby Burton Branch

The Baby Burton Branch

If it hadn’t been so miserable I’d have made some paper boats to float down in. Instead we sat inside and waited until it was dry enough to continue another few miles west.

Holiday’s in Swarkestone


With a bank holiday on the horizon we know that would only mean two things, “weather” and boaters leaving the marinas for the weekend, not that we mind either, both add to the spice of life, but we opted to moor up somewhere peaceful so we could watch the world go by.

Dandelion Row

And just as we expected the heavens opened

I’m glad we were under cover during this deluge

But the rewards were dramatic skies

I still wasnt risking going out for a walk

Our mooring spot, just below bridge 13 allowed us to look over the hedge to the rather magnificent Swarkestone Pavilion

Swarkestone Pavillion

This grade 1 listed building was thought to be built as a wedding gift in 1630 by sir John Harpur for his new wife lady Catherine Howard. It was a grandstand overlooking the bowling green of Swarkestone Hall, which is no longer there. Nowadays it’s a holiday home let by the Landmark Trust. I looked it up thinking it could be a fun venue for family get together, but despite its grandeur, it only sleeps two. Mind you, I wasn’t the only one to see it’s potential, the Rolling stones used it for a photo shoot of their album the Beggers Banquet, I’m not sure if this photo actually made it onto the album but it’s what came up on a Google search, disclaimer, I wasnt actually the photographer that day, I was still in nappies!

Showing off in Shardlow


As soon as I saw theses swans and their cygnets I knew we had to moor close by. I don’t think I’ve ever seen such confident friendly swans. But who can blame them wanting to proudly show off their young.

Let me introduce you to the family

Swans are amazingly attentive parents and clearly work as a team. I’m guessing these cygnets must have been under a week old. I was able to lean right over the water and snap these fluff balls close up.

We’re cute and we know it, please feed us…

Even when I saw them on the towpath I was able to get very close without causing any alarm to the parents, who carried on preening rather than hissing at me.

Time out for some adult pampering

But the babies needed their afternoon nap, so mum called them over and tucked them up under her wings

I’m glad we didn’t have 9 babies at the same time

You’d never have known there were 9 cygnets hiding in there.

Can you spot the one who won’t go to sleep

Of course it’s not just swans who are proud of their children, and as we cruised on, we dutifully smiled and waved as we become the local attraction.

Waving goodbye

Some Solar Stats


After a lot of procrastination I finally wired in the solar panel we fixed in place last summer.

The final solar panel in place

It takes our panel capacity from 640Watts to 1kW. I’m pleased to see the difference it makes, so have some figures to share.

Solar panels supplied by photonic universe


With the easing of lockdown and the better weather, we are now cruising in a more normal pattern for us, which admittedly is slowly. I’ve been very encouraged by the results we have seen. So far the panels are providing a lot more power than we use for propulsion and over all 51% of all the electricity we have used in the past two weeks, and when you consider we cook electric I think that is pretty impressive.
These are the figures for the past 2 weeks, mid April, weather predominantly sunny with some light cloud.
Cruising stats
• 13:47 hours cruising
• 21.9 miles covered
• 6 days cruising, 8 days moored.
Electricity usage over past 2 week
• Total 92 kW hrs
• Propulsion 12kW hrs (14%)
• Domestic 79 kW hrs (86%)
Sources of electricity over past 2 weeks
• Solar 47 kWhrs (51%)
• Gen set 38 kWhrs (42%)
• Battery 7 kWhrs (7%)
(note – the 7kWhrs of power that came from the batteries means the batteries had less charge in them at the end of the two weeks then they did at the start by 7kWhrs, which is 13% of our battery capacity.)
Power required for propulsion
• Per hour cruised – 945 watts
• Per mile of cruising – 594 watts
• While passing moored boats about 600 watts
• At average canal cruising speed (2.5-3mph) 1.7-1.8 kW

Only once in the past 14 days did we use more power for propulsion than we generated that particular day from the solar panels. That was the day we cruised for 4.5 hours downstream on the River Soar and then upstream on the River Trent. Although the boat travels faster and is more efficient on rivers, it still requires more power than on a canal. But even so, we still generated 89% of the propulsion power through the solar panels, so only 11% came from our batteries.

Power sources

Based on the past 4.5 years records, we only cruise on average once every 2.4 days. So taking into consideration our non-cruising days alongside our cruising days, the solar panels will provide far more power than we need for propulsion. In the past two weeks it has been 3.5 times as much, or 363% which means that even if we doubled the amount of cruising we do, the solar panels will still provide more power than we need for propulsion.

It is also interesting to see how much the power gained is increasing week by week. Two weeks ago the peak power was just 11.5 Amps now, at the end of April, it is over 15 Amps. I expect those figures to continue improving throughout May and June.

For other boaters reading this, you might be horrified at how much electricity we use for domestic purposes. To be fair, we are a gasless boat. We cook electric, use a 240v fridge, an electric kettle and toaster, and the washing machine heats from a cold fill. We run a diesel boiler for heating and hot water. Not to mention the other gadgets that keep us connected to the wider world.

Previous post about our solar set up https://nb-firecrest.co.uk/taking-advantage-of-the-sunshine/

Can I also take this opportunity to apologise that our contact and comments options are still disabled.

Trundling up to the Trent

We opted to stay put for the weekend and soak up the sunshine on the Zouch Cut. The sunrises were full of potential and quickly burnt off the overnight frost. As we expected the canal was busy with families enjoying themselves,

A family of 4 ducklings and proud mum

We filled our time walking through the meadows amongst the cows.

More cows

And along the bank of the river

Promenading along the river Soar at Normanton

Before we set off on the final section of 7 months on the Grand Union leicester line. The Soar flows into the cross roads of Trent at Cranfleet. Turn right to travel towards Nottingham or left for Derbyshire and straight across for the Erewash canal.

Choices, which way shall we go

Looking back you can barely see the mouth off the Soar

The mouth of the Soar is infront of the treeline

Through the Sawley cut

Sawley cut, looking towards Ratcliffe power station

Under the M1

Our prefered way to see the M1

Onto the Trent and Mersey canal

Derwent mouth, start of the Trent and Mersey Canal