Hanging around


As I’ve already said, there’s just so much to see in Liverpool, 8 months isn’t nearly long enough. I took full advantage of my daily outdoor exercise to explore. So here are a few of the people I met hanging around, watching the world go by . Obviously there’s the 4 lads from Liverpool strutting their stuff on the Pierhead. And if you’ve got the Beatles, you’ve also got to have “our Cilla” on Matthews Street.

Cilla Black

where there’s always someone hanging around keeping the buskers in tune.

John lennon and the masked busker

There are Beatles monuments everywhere, And several more representing their individual achievements The John Lennon Peace Monument which was part of a global peace campaign shows a world wrapped up in music and peace doves, just imagine….

Peace on earth

Not all the sculptures are so modern with these wooden gargoyles keeping an eye on us in Dale Street

This is what happens if you hang around pubs too much

But I can give these guys a miss, the Lambananas. 125 of them appeared since 2008. As part of the European City of Culture, the 5m high original Superlambanana ( which has now been removed) was created to represent both the import and export of Sheep and bananas through Liverpool Docks and to highlight genetic manipulation. A lot of the 125 were sold off but there are 8 still scattered around the Pierhead

A bunch of Lambananas

The Pierhead is quite a walk through history, remembering the rock stars

Billy Fury


The workers, including the horses that hauled the cargo around the docks

The Carter’s horse


The regal,

Edward V11 and his loyal subject

And the innovative, this sculpture celebrates liverpudlian Jeremiah Horrock’s, astronomical discoveries, he was the first person to calculate the transit of Venus accurately, not bad for the early 17th century

Heaven and earth

The departing, commemorates emigrants leaving to start new lives in America, (I wonder if we will be worthy of a monument, narrowboaters finally allowed to leave liverpool)

Early 20th century Emigrants

The departed, Liverpool bares the pain of loosing many at sea, this particular monument remembers the engine room crew of the Titanic, many came from Liverpool.

The Titanic memorial

The hero’s. Captain Frank Walker, who was the most successful anti submarine warfare commander serving in both WW1 and WWII

Cpt Frank Walker

And the fallen, although these three monuments aren’t objects of beauty, they mark a communal place of rememberance , they hold plaques honouring the servicemen and women from various countries and services connected with Liverpool, who lost their lives at sea in times of conflict

The three war memorials

The Tate Modern North has it’s home in the Royal Albert Dock, and there are installations outside as well as in. The art works certainly fall into the sculpture rather than monument category and I shall leave to ponder their significance.

The Sound

This one grew on me, especially with a winter sunset to light it up

The Liverpool mountain

Although I think the buildings themselves are testaments to an era gone but not forgotten as the Royal Albert Dock is a grade 1 listed heritage site,

The Royal Albert Dock

and there are strategically placed artifacts and abandoned industrial and maritime debris scattered around to marvel at.

The prop from The sunk Lusitania

I was a little saddened not to see any figurative monument directly outside the maritime museum, (which houses the museum of slavery,) remembering the transatlantic slave trade, that clouded Liverpool’s 18th century. But across the Strand is a magnificent horse sculpture called The Great Escape, the horse made out of rope, which unravels in a bid for freedom, it is meant to represent man’s effort to free himself from slavery. It’s a bit off the beaten track, (unless you’re walking to the Tesco express for icecream)

The Great Escape

The monuments in the city centre continued to be thought provoking though for many reasons
Eleanor Rigby sits all alone on Stanley Street

Just one of the lonely people

Whilst one of Lewis’ stands proud over his department store. (which is sadly now closed, along side George Henry Lee’s and TJHughes about to follow suit-for those of you who remember the big old stores)

Lewis’

Liverpool is a mighty and grand city which liked to erect monuments to the great and the good of the victorian era. Although they are the ones I tend to hurry past without recognition, I’ve had the time to read up more about these people and the service they gave to our country.

The good and the mighty

Many just followed questionable orders out of loyalty and obligation, while others sacrificed much and build a city of extremes. Extreme poverty and wealth success and destruction, nothing can be taken at face value, there is always more than one side to the story. But throughout I get an immense sense of humanity.

As the Bombed out Church, St Luke’s, is preserved to remind us. The sculpture reminds us of the British and German soldiers, who were allowed to stop fighting on Christmas day so they could play football during WW1

Football in the bombed out church


As does one of the most beloved liverpudlian of all.

Ken Dodd at Lime st Station

And you can’t beat a bit of well meaning graffiti

Well written words

Even if there’s always a Liver bird watching over you

This replica stands over the canal in the Museum of Liverpool

But we knew it was coming to a end and it was time to pack up our suitcases and move on

Suitcases outside the school of art

A Tall Story

Sheffield is known for its creativity and in the 60s the University built the iconic Arts Tower, which is still the tallest academic building in the UK. I’d have loved to have gone to the top to look down but we joined the students in Weston gardens looking up.

It seems like Sheffield has a love of tall art, we came across this wall mural called “The Snog” by Pete McKee

The Snog

And even more impressive was the “Steelworker” by Paul Waplington. It uses 18 different types of brick 30000 in total and 5 different mortars.

The steelworker

Sheffield is rightly proud of its Steel industry although sadly it’s on its last legs now. Regardless of my political leanings I feel quite strongly about this, as I expect these sheffield women of steel would also.

The women of steel and friend.

But they do have some funny ideas of what we like to see in our public art. This is known as the spiders web bridge, crossing the River Don under one of the Wicker Arches

It’s actually a very clever suspension bridge that takes it’s inspiration from nature and the cables are attached to the sides of the old brick archway

Walk across if you dare

I made if safely across in both directions so I could go and explore some more.

Byebye Brayford

Brayford pools has been home for a week. We’ve felt safe, secure and well entertained. In fact being in Lincolnshire has felt like a holiday. Our cruising has felt more about the place and people than the waterway and we’ve thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. There’s a lot of Lincoln still to be explored so I’m sure we’ll be back, but during that last week I found some quirky art work

and interesting things to look at.This was what caught my eye each time we left the marina and walked into town. And of course being a posh waterfront the Brayford had a modern tall hotel on its doorstep with a cocktail bar at the top. which I had to visit, if only to snap a photo from the lofty heights. The Brayford water chimes  were a fun modern feature, and if the wind was in the right direction we could hear a pretty tinkling chime each hour from our mooring. I climbed up to the multistory car park to see it from this angle. On our last day in Lincoln, Eric’s brother Andrew and his wife Anne came to join us as we cruised back to Saxilby. We took a detour through the glory hole and back though I’m not sure I can answer the Bridges question.